This Day (Sarawak, Singapore, and Prince Edward County Edition)

Published:March 18, 2013 by Brendan Wolfe

Robert F. Kennedy speaking at an election rally in 1968 (Photo by Harry Benson/Express/Getty Images)

 

On this day fifty years ago, U.S. attorney general Robert F. Kennedy spoke at Freedom Hall in Louisville, Kentucky, on the occasion of the Emancipation Proclamation’s centennial. As you might expect, the civil rights movement came up. Twelve years earlier, students at Robert Russa Moton school in Prince Edward County had struck for better conditions, and the need for better education continued to be acute:

We must achieve equal education opportunities for all our children regardless of race. Segregated schools cause educational as well as psychological difficulties an the resulting rain on our greatest resource—the spirit and knowledge of our children—must be eliminated.

We may observe, with as much sadness as irony that outside of Africa, south of the Sahara where education is still a difficult challenge, the only places on earth known not to provide free public education are Communist China, North Vietnam, Sarawak, Singapore, British Honduras—and Prince Edward County, Virginia.

Some sources, including for a time, Encyclopedia Virginia, include an additional sentence at the end of this paragraph: “Something must be done about Prince Edward County.” But our research has shown no evidence that Kennedy actually said this, and the Department of Justice’s copy of the remarks does not include it.

IMAGES: Robert F. Kennedy speaking at an election rally in 1968 (Harry Benson/Express/Getty Images); cover sheet and page 3 of Kennedy’s remarks, as released to the press

Discussion

1 Comment on “This Day (Sarawak, Singapore, and Prince Edward County Edition)”

  1. Larissa Fergeson

    I have tried to track down the “Something must be done about Prince Edward County” line as well recently and can’t find it. It appears with the Kennedy quote on the back of John Stokes’ book Students on Strike, and it is mentioned on the website for Mercy Seat Films “They Closed Our Schools,” http://mercyseatfilms.com/timeline.html, but I haven’t found it anywhere else.

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